CALENDAR OF LOCAL EVENTS 2004-05

September || October || November || December || January || February || March || April || May || June || July || August

SEPTEMBER 2004

2 September, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Ad Fontes

Milton Kooistra

Location: Room 304, Pratt Library, Victoria College

“Melanchthon's oration 'On the ingratitude of the Cuckoo'”

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

10 September, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Anat Gilboa, CRRS Fellow

Location: Room 205 Northrop Frye, Victoria College

“Portraits and Role-Portraits of Women by Rembrandt van Rijn”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den [sic] on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

17 September, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Jamie Smith, CRRS Graduate Fellow

Location: Room 205 Northrop Frye, Victoria College

“Those left behind: the burdens absent men placed on their families in early fifteenth century Genoa”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

17 September, 5:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Special Events at the CRRS

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

CRRS Welcome Reception

Information: 416-585-4468
Open to all members of the CRRS community

23-24 September

Non-CRRS events of interest

Poculi Ludique Societas

Location: Room 119, Emmanuel College

“Don Juan, Ladykiller of Seville” by Tirso de Molina (1579-1648), translated by Michael Kidd. Directed by Julie Florio.

Poculi Ludique Societas, Toronto's Medieval and Renaissance Players is proud to present the world premiere of a new translation of the 17th Century Spanish play. This Spanish Classic - the source of Mozart's Don Giovanni - follows the sexual adventures of Don Juan around the Mediterranean as he seduces the maidens of Naples and Seville. His relatives and servant try to check his recklessness; but it takes a statue from the tomb of the father of one of his victims, to deliver his fatal comeuppance.

SHOW DATES:

Thursday Sept 23, Friday Sept. 24, Saturday Sept. 25 at 8 p.m. Matinees: Saturday Sept. 24 - Sunday Sept 26th at 2p.m. Thursday Sept 30, Friday, Oct 1 at 8 p.m. (NO performance on Oct 2) Matinee: Sunday Oct 3 at 2 p.m. Thursday Oct 7, Friday Oct 8, Saturday Oct 9 at 8 p.m. Matinees: Saturday Oct 9, Sunday Oct 10 at 2p.m.

Prices: $20 Regular, $15 Seniors, $10 Students

Box Office: 416-978-5096.

Visit the Society's Website for further information.

24 September, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Ad Fontes

Tuija Ainonen

Location: Room 304, Pratt Library, Victoria College

“Gottfried Achenwall (1719-1772), Elementa iuris naturae”

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

24 September, 4:15 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

David L. Vander Meulen, University of Virginia

Location: Faculty of Information Studies Lecture Theatre, 140 St. George St.

“ How to Read Book History”

Reception to follow

30 September, 8 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Nicolas Orme, University of Exeter

Location: Lillian H. Smith Public Library, 239 College Street, Toronto

“The Origins of Children's Literature”

There will be a reception after the talk upstairs in the Osborne Room. Professor Orme's visit to Toronto has been arranged by the Friends of the Osborne Collection for Early Children's Literature. Please direct any inquiries about this event to Professor Patricia Bruckmann at bruckman@trinity.toronto.edu

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OCTOBER 2004

1-2 October

Non-CRRS events of interest

7th Annual St. Michael's College Symposium

Location: Charbonnel Lounge

“ Rule Makers and Rule Breakers”

Visit the Symposium's website for futher information

4 October, 4-6p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Ian Lancashire, Department of English

Location: Room 4049, 4th Floor, Robarts Library

“The Lexicons of Early Modern English (LEME)”

Prof. Lancashire's electronic database gathers together the dictionaries, grammars, and linguistic vade mecums [sic] of scores of "harmless drudges," thus making it possible, for the first time, to get a comprehensive view of not only how Early Modern English men and women spoke, but how they "defined" how they spoke.
As always, all and sundry are both invited and encouraged to attend this valuable session.

6 October, 4 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Suzanne Akbari, English & CMS

Location: Room 400 Alumni Hall, 120 St Joseph St, SMC

“ Empty Idols and a False Prophet: European Representations of Islam, 1100-1450”

A reception will follow the lecture in the Shook Common Room of PIMS.

8 October, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Milton Kooistra, Iter fellow

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“'Please add my name to your list of friends (album amicorum)': letters of introduction in sixteenth-century German academic culture”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

14 October, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the TRRC

Davide Panagia

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“Typographical Biases, or The Noise of the Utterance ”

A lecture sponsored by the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS)

Read “Typographical Biases” beforehand.

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Tea & coffee will be served at 4:00 p.m.; the talk will begin at 4:15 p.m

14 October, 5 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Nick Everett, History & CMS

Location: TBA

“Roman versus Barbarian Law. Which was more barbaric?”

A talk for the Premodern Discussion Group of the Department of History.

15 October, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Irina Guletsky, CRRS Fellow

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“The Formal Design of 14th Century Anonymous Massess: An Iconographical Canon and the Problem of Restoration”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

21 October, 5:00 p.m.

Convivium

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“Thinking of Graduate School? A discussion for anyone considering Graduate School in the Arts and Social Sciences”

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Convivium is a seminar series for undergraduates interested in Renaissance & Reformation Studies

21 October, 5:10 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Barbara Rosenwein, Loyola University

Location: Room 119, Northrop Frye Hall

“Merovingian Passions”

This paper takes up three different "emotional communities"-- roups that valued, devalued and expressed certain emotions in common, thus sharing a particular emotional style--in Merovingian Francia. The Merovingian period (c.500-751) has been seen as violent, crass, and unfeeling. That view is based on a certain way of reading the texts of Merovingian writers. Bringing a new set of questions to those same sources-- questions based on understanding emotions as cognitivist psychologists understand them-- yields a new view. One group did revel in violence, but a different one privileged love and family feeling, and a third avoided most emotional expression entirely, disparaging women because they were seen as particularly passionate. Indeed, I see this latter group as the source of one tradition of anti-female emotions discourse.

21 October, 4:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Dario Brancato, The Humanities Centre's Jan Blumenstein Graduate Student Fellow 2004-2005

Location: Room 330, University College

“Boethius in Renaissance Florence: Varchi's Translation of De Consolatione Philosophiae and the Commentary of Pseudo-Thomas Aquina”

A talk for the University of Toronto Humanities Centre.

21-23 October

Non-CRRS events of interest

Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto

Location: Munk Centre

“Visions of the East: Orientalism and German National Culture”

Registration: mark.laszlo.herbert@utoronto.ca
CRRSers might be interested in particular in Friday, October 22, 2004, Panel One: Orientalism Between Religion and Politics, 9:00-11:30 a.m. Room 208N, Nina Berman, Ohio State University "Martin Luther on the Turks."

22 October, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.

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James Carley, York University

Location: Room 304, Pratt Library, Victoria College

“John Leland on the English Poets”

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

28-30 October

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

The Sixteenth Century Society Conference

Location: Marriott Eaton Centre Hotel and the University of Toronto

Information: For conference program, visit the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference website.

28 October, 5:30- 7:30 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the CRRS Annual Erasmus Lecture

Jeffrey Chipps Smith (University of Texas, Austin)

Location: Marriott Eaton Centre Hotel
525 Bay Street, Salon IV & V

“Jesuit Confraternities and the Art of Catholic Formation in Early Modern Germany”

Information: Please contact the CRRS at 416-585-4468
Reception in Lower Lobby to follow lecture; registration for conference is not required to attend lecture or reception.
Abstract: Jesuit confraternities played a critical role in buttressing Catholic faith and communal religious identity in the German-speaking lands during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. As the Protestant Reformation spread across Central Europe, the Society of Jesus offered a dynamic Catholic alternative. The Jesuits founded exemplary schools, built often sumptuous churches, and participated in various missionary activities. Their initiatives included the establishment of confraternities or sodalities for students and adults, for laity and clergy, and, in some instances, for women as well as men. Their goal was the creation of a supportive spiritual and social framework that helped the individual lead a pious life even amid the temptations of this world. These sodalities, most dedicated to the Virgin Mary, commissioned art, including private oratories, sold saint-of-the-month cards, performed plays, organized pilgrimages and processions, and labored to help individual and community alike i in their religious formation. Much like a modern fraternal organization, such as the Lions Club, these Jesuit-directed confraternities fostered local, regional, and even international ties. This lecture will consider the diverse uses of art to achieve their goals.

29-31 October

Non-CRRS events of interest

Location: Harvard University

New Directions 2: The Early Middle Ages Today

A Conference by the Committee on Medieval Studies at Harvard University.

Visit the conference website.

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NOVEMBER 2004

4 November, 5:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Erik Thomson, University of Toronto

Location: TBA, Department of History

“For a comparative history of early modern diplomacy: French and Swedish emissaries and political cultures in the early seventeenth century”

A talk for the Premodern Discussion Group of the Department of History.

5 November, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the TRRC

Lynn Magnusson

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“Donne's Language: The Conditions of Communication”

A lecture sponsored by the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS)

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Tea & coffee will be served at 4:00 p.m.; the talk will begin at 4:15 p.m

9 November, 4:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Alexandra Johnston, University of Toronto

Location: Room 001, Emmanuel College

“The play of the Coronation of the Virgin As performed in Elche, Valencia, Spain August 14-15, 2004”

An illustrated talk by Professor Alexandra Johnston. Professor Johnston was in Elche this August for the performance of this play that traces its origins back to the late fifteenth century. Sung in Catalan, the play features three spectacular hoisting devices that descend and ascend approximately sixty metres from the stage to the 'heaven' in the cupola of the basilica. Come and hear about this spectacular survival of the medieval theatre. A reception in the Senior Common Room of Burwash Hall will follow the lecture. Co-sponsored by Records of Early English Drama and the Poculi Ludique Societas.

11 November, 4:00 p.m.

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John Kerrigan, University of Cambridge

Location: Alumni Hall, Old Vic

“Archipelagic Macbeth: Shakespeare's Scottish Play in the Context of the new British History”

Cosponsored by the TRRC and the Department of English

12 November, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Jim Thomas, CRRS Fellow

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“The Skepticism of Descartes as a Method in Metaphysics”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

12 November, 4:15 p.m.

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Ralph Hexter, University of California, Berkeley

Location: Room 100, Alumni Hall, SMC

“The medieval historiography of Latin literature and the historiography of medieval Latin literature”

This is the O'Donnell lecture in medieval Latin studies. A reception in the Common Room of the Pontifical Institute of Mediaevel Studies will follow the lecture.
A jointly sponsored lecture with the Centre for Medieval Studies, the Centre for Comparative Literature, the Classics Department, the Department of History, and the Journal of Medieval Latin.

15 November, 4 p.m.

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Brian Ostrowski, resident Director of the Council on International Education in Hanoi

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“The Virtuous Lord Jesus: Christology in the Jesuit Mission in Seventeenth-Century Vietnam”

Information: 416-585-4468

A jointly sponsored talk with the Department of History and the Asian Institute.
Brian Ostrowski (Ph.D. cand., History, Cornell University) is a Ph.D. candidate in History at Cornell University, as well as the Resident Director of the CIEE Study Center at Vietnam National University. Brian specializes in Vietnamese history of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. His dissertation is on the localization of Christian beliefs and practices in seventeenth-century Vietnam and is tentatively titled The Way of the Virtuous Lord of Heaven: Christianity in the Seventeenth-Century Jesuit Mission in Vietnam. Brian is the translator of Quadragesima, the Great Season of Fasting (1634) and co-translator of Departed Spirits of the Viet Realm (1329).He is currently the resident director of the Council on International Educational Exchange, Viet Nam National University.
Abstract: Study of the history of Christianity in Vietnam has traditionally focused on the growth of Christian missions in the country and their relations with the Vietnamese state, with little regard for the substance of Christian belief and practice within the missions. Only recently have scholars begun to attempt to define what exactly Christianity meant to those who taught and lived it in pre-colonial Vietnam.
A central question in determining the nature of early Vietnamese Christianity is how the initial missionaries and converts understood the figure of Jesus of Nazareth. This presentation discusses the first systematic Christ story in Vietnamese language, a ten-volume text entitled Duc Chua Giesu [The Virtuous Lord Jesus], attributed to Geronimo Maiorica, S.J. in around the 1630s. Related Jesuit missionary texts from the first half of the seventeenth century are also discussed.
In the absence of a Vietnamese translation of the Bible, Duc Chua Giesu served as an abridged, unified relation of the gospels. Because it was written in Nom, the Vietnamese vernacular script, rather than the classical Chinese characters preferred by the literati of the day, the text was able to reach widely throughout the Vietnamese countryside, being read aloud in Christian communities more often by native catechists than by foreign missionaries.
Yet precisely because Maiorica's Christ story is a synthesis of Gospel accounts, reflecting various omissions and exuberances in relation to the source texts, it is possible to examine how the early Jesuit missionaries in Vietnam attempted to customize the image of Jesus for their audience. These customizations meant that Jesus was not understood as having certain of the significances long regarded as crucial in the Christian tradition. At the same time, the Christ of the early mission in Vietnam was subtly localized in order to appeal to Vietnamese cultural sensibilities and to overcome potential cultural objections to the Jesuits' message.
The impact of Duc Chua Giesu on the Jesuit mission in Vietnam as a whole will be assessed, and excerpts of the text in English translation will be provided for reference.

19 November, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

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Ian Sloan, CRRS Fellow

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“Metre, Measures and Gailliards: the Whole Booke of Psalmes (London,1562) and its Tunes”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

22 November

Convivium

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall

“Using the Web Wisely: A discussion of some excellent resources available”

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates or call 416-585-4468
Convivium is a seminar series for undergraduates interested in Renaissance & Reformation Studies

23 November, 2 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Special Event at the Department of History

Location: Common Room of the Department of Fine Art, 6th floor of the Sidney Smith Building, 100 St George St

Evonne Levy, "Reniassance Baroque or Baroque Renaissance? On Shearman's 'Only Connect'"

Matt Kavaler, "Architectural Jokes in 16th-Century Gothic"

Bernice Iarocci, "Fantasy and Mannerist Composition"

Three papers that were presented at the Sixteenth Century Studies conference a few weeks ago will be presented in the department. Anyone is welcome to attend.

25 November, 4 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Anne Dillon (Guest, PIMS)

Location: Laurence K. Shook Common Room . PIMS

“King Henry VIII and the 'Pious Scrutineer': The Martyrdom of Friar John Forest.”

Lecture sponsored by the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.

26 November, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.

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Speaker: Jamie Smith

Location:  Room 304, Pratt Library

Leonardo Giustiniani's Funeral Oration for Carlo Zeno

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

26, 27 November, 5:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

The Dante Society of Toronto, The Emilio Goggio Chair in Italian Studies, and Centro Scuola e Cultura Italiana

Location: Robert Gill Theatre, University of Toronto Drama Centre, 214 College Street (entrance on St. George)

From Dante to Shakespeare: Italian Literature in Medieval and Early Modern England, a symposium

November 26th, 2004 7:30 p.m. Dante in Translation with a New Version of the Inferno in Terza Rima by Celestino De Iuliis by Professor Giuseppe Mazzotta, Yale University

8:30 p.m. Performances from Dante and Shakespeare with Jennifer Dale as Cleopatra, Phelia, Portia and Geza Kovacs as Hamlet, Lear, Richard II

Saturday, November 27th, 2004, 10.00 a.m. - 4.00 p.m. Conference. Speakers include: John Astington (University of Toronto), David Galbraith (University of Toronto), Alexandra Johnston (University of Toronto), Jill Levenson (University of Toronto), William Robins, University of Toronto, Antonio Sorella (Università Gabriele D'Annunzio, Pescara)

Reception to follow. Everyone welcome. For information, please call 416-926-2345

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DECEMBER 2004

1 December, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

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Brenda Hosington, Université de Montréal, Linguistique et traduction

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“William Bercher's Englishing of Lodovico Domenichi's La Nobilità delle donne: Translation at the service of Ambition”

A lecture sponsored by the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS)

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Tea & coffee will be served at 4:00 p.m.; the talk will begin at 4:15 p.m

Abstract: Translation in the Renaissance functioned, amongst other things, as a means of attracting patronage and preferment, obtaining favours, advancing careers, and furthering ambitions. This is admirably illustrated by the case of William Bercher's [Barker's] English translation of an Italian text on women by Lodovico Domenichi, the 1549 Nobiltà delle donne. Bercher presented his Dyssputacion off the Nobylyte off wymen, in manuscript form, to Queen Elizabeth in 1559. While he kept Domenichi's quasi-documentary dialogue form, he changed the setting from a Sforza marriage celebration in Milan to a gathering at Petriolo, a spa-town just south of Siena. He also executed other changes to the original, whose existence, incidentally, he never acknowledges, but this paper will focus on those that he clearly made with an eye both to making the text more relevant to an English audience and to furthering his ambitions. In 1559 this fascinating scholar-translator was private secretary to the Duke of Norfolk, whom he would betray a dozen years later when interrogated about his and the Duke's roles in the Rodolfi plot. His translation, which situates the Petriolo debate some time between 1549 and 1553, contains several flattering references to his employer and family, placed in the mouths of two visiting Englishmen not in Domenichi's text. It also praises learned Englishwomen in the place of their Italian sisters. Among them are Mary Tudor and her sister the princess Elizabeth, both of whom Bercher insists are capable of assuming the role of sovereign, an addition to the original that must be seen in the context in England of the controversy over women's fitness to govern. Finally, the translation is preceded by Bercher's own preface and a dedicatory letter to Queen Elizabeth, in which he informs the young queen of her mother's generosity in financing his studies in Cambridge and flatters her as a learned young woman. Bercher obviously hoped that by offering her only one year after her coronation a treatise in which women's virtues outstrip their supposed vices he might procure an even more advantageous position than private secretary to the Duke of Norfolk. His gesture seems not to have borne fruit. However, he has left us a translation in which the dialogue is lively, courtly and sometimes more emotional than in Domenichi's Nobiltà (more in fact in keeping with Castiglione's Cortegiano), in which the essential viewpoint concerning women is not changed, and in which the introduction of English features and an English preface and dedication forms an integral part of the literary production that is the Dyssputacion.

1 December, 4:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Antonio Sorella, Universita Gabriele D'Annunzio

Location:Madden Auditorium, Carr Hall, 100 St. Joseph Street

“Pescara Iconography of the Divine Comedy”

Reception to follow. Everyone welcome. For information, please call 416-926-2345

3 December, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Virginia Strain, CRRS Fellow

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“On the Outside Looking Inn: Coterie Culture in Love's Labours Lost

Information: 416-585-4468

9 December, 5:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Andy Orchard, University of Toronto

Location: Room 6, Northrop Frye Hall

“Histories of Medieval Iceland: Fact and Fiction”

A talk for the Premodern Discussion Group of the Department of History.

10 December, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Ad Fontes

Jess Paehlke

Location:  Room 304, Pratt Library

An excerpt from the anonymous "Gymnastica monachorum" concerning the Renaissance debate on Plato vs. Aristotle.

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

17 December, 8:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

SINE NOMINE Ensemble for Medieval Music

Location:Saint Thomas's Anglican Church, 383 Huron Street (one block south of Bloor Street, between the St George and Spadina subway stations)

Christmas in Court and Chapel

Tickets $15 ($10 for students, seniors, and the unwaged)
This programme highlights Christmas music from the international world of late-Gothic courts and their household chapels, a brilliant repertoire created by professional musicians whose services were actively sought by secular and ecclesiastical rulers all over Europe. The concert includes vocal polyphony, "soft instruments" (fiddles, lute, gittern, harp, recorders), and a "loud band" of shawms and sackbuts. Performers are Katherine Hill, Janice Kerkkamp, Bryan Martin, Randall Rosenfeld, and Andrea Budgey, with special guest Cam Walter.
For more information, reservations, or press tickets, please contact SINE NOMINE:
Telephone 416-638-9445 Fax 416-926-7292 E-mail sine.nomine@3web.net Website www.pims.ca/sinenomine

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JANUARY 2005

20 January, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the TRRC

Myra Rosenfeld

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“Witness to History: The Hôtel de Cluny, and Abbot's Palace in Renaissance Paris”

A lecture sponsored by the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS)

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Tea & coffee will be served at 4:00 p.m.; the talk will begin at 4:15 p.m

20 January, 5:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Jennifer DeSilva, History

Location: Room 119, Northrop Frye Hall

“'A man with a mission': the development and responsibilities of the papal Master of Ceremonies”

A talk for the Premodern Discussion Group of the Department of History.

21 January, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Ad Fontes

Jess Paehlke

Location:  Room 304, Pratt Library

“Plato v. Aristotle: A Renaissance Debate”

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

28 January 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

James Carscallen

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“The Praise of Folly and an Age of Experience”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

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FEBRUARY 2005

4 February, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

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William Calin, University of Florida

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“Renaissance in the South of France: Poetry in Occitan (Provencal)”

William Calin is a visiting fellow of the CRRS this year. He is Graduate Research Professor in Romance Languages & Literatures from the University of Florida. His area of specialization is medieval French, Occitan, Anglo-Norman, and Breton literature.

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

7, 8, 9 February, 4:30 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Massimo Ciavolella, Italian Studies, UCLA

Location: Room 140, University College, 15 King's College Circle

“The Grief of Love: Ancient and Early Modern Perspectives in Western Culture”

2005 F. E. L. Priestley Memorial Lectures

7 February “'Paler than grass': Love as a disease in classical antiquity”
8 February “'De amore herico': The diseases of love in medieval medical thought”
9 February “'The loverers maladye of hereos': eros in literature from the Roman de la rose to Petrarch”

11 February, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Joanna Carraway

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“The Prosecution of Adultery in Regio Emilia, 1371-1409”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

21 February, 4:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Jeffrey Muller, Brown University

Location: Room 140, University College

“White Slavery, Brotherhood, and Art in Early Modern Antwerp: The Confraternity of the Holy Trinity in the Parish Church of St. Jacob”

2005 Brieger Lecture

Reception to follow

23 February, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the TRRC

Ken Mills

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“Drawing on America: The Words and Pictures of Diego de Ocaña O.S.H. 1599-1608” 

A lecture sponsored by the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS)

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Tea & coffee will be served at 4:00 p.m.; the talk will begin at 4:15 p.m

24 February, 5:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Milton Kooistra, CMS

Location: Room 231, Northrop Frye Hall

“'Friends Hold All Things In Common': Humanist Friendships as the Backbone of Recommending”

A talk for the Premodern Discussion Group of the Department of History

25 February, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Ad Fontes

Milton Kooistra

Location:  Room 304, Pratt Library

“Wolfgang Capito's 16th-century description of German Jewish burial procedures”

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

25 February

Non-CRRS events of interest

Bernard Klein

Location: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Common Room, 59 Queen's Park Crescent East

“Déflation urbaine: The Restructuring of Roman Infrastructure in the Wake of the Germanic Migrations”

A talk sponsored by the Centre of Medieval Studies

Abstract: The crisis in Roman ideology which brought the migrations in tow led to far-reaching changes in the culture of settlement from the late third century on. During the sixth century, after the invasions, the relationship between city and countryside was reversed. This lecture considers the question how inhabitants confronted the process of shrinking cities, and the consequences for the shape of the city. It will be shown, by way of the illustration of the Roman amphitheater, how monumental architectural structures were transformed while the typologies of buildings were maintained. Finally, the significance of Roman buildings as forerunners of the medieval city will be discussed.

25 February, 8 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Sine Nomine

Saint Thomas's Anglican Church, 383 Huron Street

Medieval Roots and Branches

There are many connections between medieval music and the "folk" music of European (and European-based) cultures, some clear and some enigmatic. SINE NOMINE explores the relationship between the music of the Middle Ages and the traditional music of later centuries in this lively programme for a winter's night.

Tickets are $15 ($10 for students, seniors, and the unwaged). Telephone 416-638-9445 Fax 416-926-7292 E-mail or visit the website for further inforamtion.

26 February

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“Negotiations between Oral and Written Traditions”

Location: Alumni Hall, Old Vic

Organizers: Stephanie Treloar and Maureen Epp

View the pdf of the program and abstracts for the conference.

View the pdf of the registration form for the conference.

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MARCH 2005

5 March

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Seminar for undergraduates from across Ontario

Location: Pratt Library

The Bible in the Renaissance and Reformation

The CRRS presents the Second Annual Seminar on the Bible in the Renaissance and Reformation. Application deadline is January 14, 2005. See the Seminar's webpage for further details.

7-31 March

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Metamorphosis Festival

Location: Pratt Library

Early Printed Editions of Ovid's Metamorphoses, 1500-1800

As part of Toronto's Metamorphosis Festival, the CRRS has organized a rare book display that exhibits over thirty rare early printed books from the collections of the University of Toronto Libraries, in five languages, ranging from the early 16th century to the late 18th century.

Book display times are 8:30 a.m. to 11:45 p.m. M-Th; 8:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. Fridays; 12:00 noon to 4:45 p.m. Saturdays and 1:00 p.m. to 11:45 p.m. Sundays..

10 March, 5:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Alexandra Guerson de Oliveira, History

Location: TBA

“Playing the ethnic card: Mestiços and Indian Slavery in Sixteenth-Century Brazil”

A talk for the Premodern Discussion Group of the History Department

11-13 March

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

“Metamorphosis: The Changing Face of Ovid in Medieval and Early Modern Europe”

Location: Alumni Hall

Information: Visit the centre's web site. Click on "Conferences" then "Annual Conference".

14 March

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Anne Hudson

Location: PIMS, Senior Common Room

“Burnt or Chained? Wyclif's Works in England c.1380-c.1540”

Cosponsored with the Centre for Medieval Studies

14 March, 1:00-6:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Workshop

Location: Charbonel Lounge, Elmsley Hall, 81 St. Mary Street

“ The Mediations of Royal Entry Ceremonies(1530-1650)”

A workshop sponsored by the Groupe de Recherche sur les Entrées Solennelles with the support of the Department of French, University of Toronto.
Schedule:
Anne-Laure Van Bruaene, Visiting Fellow CRRS
Negotiations Between City and Prince: Entries in the Low Countries, c. 1450-1650
Lyse Roy, Université du Québec à Montréal
Guerre et Paix. Les entrées de Charles Quint en 1539-1540
Scott Schofield, University of Toronto
The Politics of James Ist Royal Entry in London in 1604
Agnes Juhasz-Ormsby, York University
The Sources of Anne Boleyn's 1533 Royal Entry in London
Dylan Reid, University of Toronto
The Renaissance in Rouen: The Context of the Royal Entries of 1532 and 1550
Benoît Bolduc, University of Toronto
The Printed Records of Henri II's Entries in France
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

16 March, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the TRRC

Bernard Klein

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“L'arte è cosa mentale: The Rational Order of the City within the Natural Order of the Landscape in Early Modern Europe”

A lecture sponsored by the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS)

Abstract: The interrelationship between city and countryside evolved fom late antiquity on. At the end of the fifteenth century the connection was redefined, first in Florence: the rediscovery and translation of, and commentary on, authors relevant to the shape of cities, Vitruvius and Polybius, and practical attempts to form a synthesis between ancient theories and the fundamental aspects of Christianity gave rise to the search for a society newly defined in its architectural expression. An analysis of the planning of Pienza, the first example of Renaissance urban design and the first utopia of Sforzinda, will bring into view the divide between the nostalgic and progressive interpretations of antiquity. In this light differing views of the Renaissance as seen in Leon Battista Alberti's De re aedificatoria libri decem and Antonio Averlino's ("Filarete's") Trattato di architettura will be considered.

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Tea & coffee will be served at 4:00 p.m.; the talk will begin at 4:15 p.m

18 March, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Ad Fontes

Moved to 1 April

Location:  Room 304, Pratt Library

Subject: TBA

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

18-20, 24-27 March

Non-CRRS events of interest

Poculi Ludique Societas

Location: Room 119, Emmanuel Hall

“Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay”

Gala Performance: 18 March, 8p.m.
19 March, 8p.m.
19, 20 March 2p.m.
24, 25, 26 March, 8p.m.
26,27 March, 2p.m.

Box office 416-978-5096
$10 Students, $15 Seniors, $20 Regular

22 March, 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the CRRS DVS

William B. Taylor, University of California, Berkeley

Location: Alumni Hall, Old Vic

“Short Journeys to Sacred Places: Devotional Landscapes and Circulation in Early Modern Mexico”

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates

View the poster

23 March, 4:00 p.m.

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Julius Kirshner

Location: PIMS, Senior Common Room

“Made Exiles for the Sake of Knowledge: Student Domicile in Late Medieval Italy”

Cosponsored with the Centre for Medieval Studies.
Reception to follow lecture.
poster

24 March, 2:00-4:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Special Events at the CRRS

Julius Kirshner

Location: History Department, Room 2098, Sidney Smith Building

Seminar: “Self-defense, Vendetta, and Peace in Medieval Italy: Socio-legal Perspectives ”

Cosponsored with the Centre for Medieval Studies.

24 March, 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the CRRS DVS

William B. Taylor, University of California, Berkeley

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“The Culture and Politics of Miracles in Colonial Mexico”

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates

View the poster

29 March, 3:00 pm

Non-CRRS events of interest

Professor Giles Knox, Indiana University, Bloomington

Location: Room 179, University College

“Velázquez and the Absence of Affetti”

A talk for the Graduate History of Art Students' Association, University of Toronto.
A reception will follow in the Fine Art Department Common Room (Sidney Smith Hall, 6th floor).

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APRIL 2005

1 April, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Ad Fontes

Tuija Ainonen

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall

Translations of Gottfried Achenwall, Iuris Naturalis Posterior

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

N.B. Time and location.

1 April, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Mark Crane, Nipissing University

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“Humanizing Late-Medeival Devotion?: Josse Bade's 'Vita' and Edition of the Works of Thomas a Kempis”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

7 April, 5:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Janine Riviera, History

Location: Room 2098, Sidney Smith Hall

“Filthy Dreamers and Scurrilous Dreams: The Politics of Dreams in Seventeenth-Century England”

A talk for the Premodern Discussion Group of the History Department

7-9 April

Non-CRRS events of interest

Location: Queens', Clare, and Fitzwilliam Colleges, University of Cambridge, England

The 51st annual conference of the Renaissance Society of America

Information: Visit the RSA website.

12 April, 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Special Events at the CRRS

Location: Room 119 Emmanuel

Toronto. Moving the City

Part One: Nathan Phillips Square.
Final critique and presentation of projects by students of the Bauhaus University Weimar, Faculty of Architecture, Chair of Urban Design, Prof. Dr. Bernhard Klein, Winter term 2004/2005
Individuals and small groups worked on fictive urban design solutions for Nathan Phillips Square. Some of the projects shown use the larger scale while others prefer very small interventions capable of shifting the focus; both try to capture Toronto`s speed of urban change within the last forty years (www.uni-weimar.de/architektur/staedtebau2).
Some of the students had the opportunity to enlargen thier knowledge by studying virtual model construction with Jun.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Frank Petzold (infar.architektur.uni-weimar.de/jpai).

Both the students and Professor Klein invite you to join them for presentation and discussion of the projects.

15 April, Postponed until 29 April

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Jess Paehlke, Iter fellow

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“15th-century Monastic Humanism at Bethleem (near Louvain): A Defence of Classical Literature”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

N.B. Talk will be rescheduled

15 April, 4:00 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Antony Grafton, Princeton University

Location: Room 100, Alumni Hall, 120 St Joseph St

“Johannes Trithemius: History, Philology, and Magic in Renaissance Germany”

The 2005 Leonard E. Boyle, OP Lecture.
Reception to follow lecture in the PIMS Common Room.

16 April

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

Location: Alumni Hall,
Old Vic

The Inaugural Canada Milton Seminar

“Milton, Nationalism, and Seventeenth-Century Politics”

This coming year sees the inauguration of the Canada Milton Seminar sponsored by the CRRS and Canada Research Chair funds. The aim of the seminar is to provide a focus in the form of an annual meeting for scholars, especially Canadian scholars, working not only on Milton but also on early modern literature and culture in general. Invited speakers include Victoria Khan (Berkeley) on “Milton's Disappointed Nationalism,” Mary Nyquist (Toronto) on “Slavery, Marriage, and the Nation in Milton and Locke,” and Willy Maley (Glasgow) on “Milton's History of Britain (1670) and the New British History.”

There will also be an annual general meeting at which members will eb able to share ideas on how the Milton Seminar can best develop. Lunch will be served and the gathering will end with a reception. There will be a nominal registration fee of $25.00.

Download the Registration form.

Map of Victoria University

View the program

Accomodations

Information: For further information please contact Paul Stevens

22 April, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Philippa Sheppard

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“'Admit me Chorus to this history': Shakespeare's prologues on page and screen”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

22-23 April

Non-CRRS events of interest

The Centre for Comparative Literature

Location: TBA

“Across Disciplines: En-visioning the Readable / Reading the Visual”

Information: Visit the Comparative Literature website.

22 April, 8 p.m.

Non-CRRS events of interest

Sine Nomine

Saint Thomas's Anglican Church, 383 Huron Street

Pilgrimage to Compostela

The great church of Saint James at Compostela was one of the most popular pilgrimage goals of the Middle Ages (and remains a great attraction for modern pilgrims). SINE NOMINE celebrates this enduring tradition with music in honour of Saint James, pieces about pilgrimage, and readings recounting the travels of the faithful.

Tickets are $15 ($10 for students, seniors, and the unwaged). Telephone 416-638-9445 Fax 416-926-7292 E-mail or visit the website for further inforamtion.

29 April, 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

Click here to learn more about Ad Fontes

Speaker: TBA

Location:  Room 304, Pratt Library

Subject: TBA

Information: email Jess Paehlke or see the Ad Fontes home page

N.B. Time change.

29 April, 3:3-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Jess Paehlke, Iter fellow

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“15th-century Monastic Humanism at Bethleem (near Louvain): A Defence of Classical Literature”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

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MAY 2005

9, 12, 16, 19 May, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

Location: Room 235, Northrop Frye Hall

Professor Alexandra Johnston, Dr. Abigail Young, and Dr. Arleane Ralph

“Reading Early Modern English Hands”

This workshop will cover literary, administrative and legal documents of the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries in a variety of hands; Anglo-Latin is included.
Fee: $100.00 for four two-hour classes (materials included)
Registration

20 May, 3:3-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Jennifer Roberts-Smith

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“Norwich: a Topography of Patronised Performance, 1540-1642”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

24-27 May, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

Location: Room 205, Northrop Frye Hall

Professor James Farge

“Reading Early Modern French Hands”

This workshop will cover administrative and legal documents of the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries in a variety of hands.
Fee: $100.00 for four two-hour classes (materials included)
Registration

27 May, 3:3-5:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Jim Thomas

Location: Room 231, Northrop Frye Hall, Victoria College

“Archimedes' Fulcrum in Descartes's Meditations”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

N.B. Room change

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JUNE 2005

16-18 June 2005

Non-CRRS events of interest

Seventeenth Waterloo Conference on Elizabethan Theatre

Location: University of Waterloo

Religion and Theatre

Visit the conference webpage for further details.

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JULY 2005

July 4th - August 25th 2005

Non-CRRS events of interest

Cork Latin and Greek Summer School

Location: University College Cork, Ireland

8-Week intensive Latin and Greek Summer School

The Department of Classics offers an intensive 8-week summer school for beginners with parallel courses in Latin and Greek. The courses are primarily aimed at postgraduate students in diverse disciplines who need to acquire a knowledge of either of the languages for further study and research, and at teachers whose schools would like to reintroduce Latin and Greek into their curriculum. In each language 6 weeks will be spent completing the basic grammar and a further 2 weeks will be spent reading simple, unadapted texts. Students in the Latin course will have the option of reading classical or medieval texts in the final 2 weeks. For further information and an application form see our website: or contact Vicky Janssens, Department of Classics, University College Cork, Ireland, tel.: +353 21 4903618/2359, fax: +353 21 4903277

11-14 July

Non-CRRS events of interest

Location: Leeds, England

Leeds International Medieval Congress

Information: Visit the Leeds IMC website.

11 July- 5 August 2005

Non-CRRS events of interest

2005 NEH Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers

Location: Center for Renaissance Studies, The Newberry Library

“Travel Writing, Skepticism, and Religious Belief in Renaissance France”

Supported by a major grant from The National Endowment for the Humanities.
Applications must be postmarked no later than March 1, 2005.
View the pdf announcement.

11 July- 5 August 2005

Non-CRRS events of interest

Mellon Summer Institutes in Vernacular Paleography

Location: Huntington Library

“ Spanish Paleography”

Applications available in January for the March 15 deadline.

View the pfd of the announcement.

18 July-12 August, 2005

Non-CRRS events of interest

Mellon Summer Institutes in Vernacular Paleography

Location: Newberry Library Center for Renaissance Studies

“ Italian Paleography”

Applications available in January for the March 15 deadline.

View the pfd of the announcement.

23 September

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Michael Ullyot

“Toward a History of English Renaissance Medievalism ”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

6 October, 4:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the CRRS Annual Erasmus Lecture

Irena Backus

Location: Alumni Hall, Victoria College (tentative)

“Saints, sexual deviants or ciphers? 16th century Lives of Continental Reformers”

13 October, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the TRRC

Paul Stevens

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“Shakespeare on Globalization: The Merchant of Venice and the work of literary criticism”

A lecture sponsored by the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS)

Read “Typographical Biases” beforehand.

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Tea & coffee will be served at 4:00 p.m.; the talk will begin at 4:15 p.m

14-15 October, 2005

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

“Sources of the Reformation: Correspondence of Wolfgang Capito and Fellow Reformers”

Location: Private Dining Room, Burwash Hall

This workshop will explore the problems of transcribing, translating, and annotating manuscripts for the Capito Project, a three-volume edition of the correspondence of the Strasbourg reformer Wolfgang Capito. Participants will include representatives from ongoing editions of Erasmus, Beatus Rhenanus, Bucer, Bullinger, and Beza. The Keynote Speaker will be Thomas Brady (UC--Berkeley), For additional information, please contact the organizer, Professor Erika Rummel.

22 October, 2005

Non-CRRS events of interest

The fourth annual conference of the Centre for Research in Renaissance Studies, Roehampton University

Location: Roehampton University

Renaissance Lives

Dr David Starkey will give the Turner Lecture in Renaissance Studies (keynote lecture).

Invited speakers will include Tom Healy (Professor of Renaissance Studies, Birkbeck University of London), Kate McLuskie (Director, The Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon- Avon), and Marion Wynne-Davies (Reader in English, Dundee University).

Papers are invited from academic staff, independent researchers and postgraduate students on the following or related topics:

classical and Renaissance biography; modern biography; hidden/invented/exemplary lives; constructions of the self; astrology; popular and formal portrayal in ballads, chapbooks, portraiture, or funerary sculpture; literary, historical or artistic figures in film, theatre and fiction; or any combination of these topics. Interdisciplinary approaches and perspectives will be particularly welcome.

Proposals (250-300 words) for short papers (maximum 2,500 words) should be submitted by 30 June 2005 to Susanne Greenhalgh (s.greenhalgh@roehampton.ac.uk). Accepted papers - to be submitted by 15 September - will be circulated by Seminar Chairs before the conference, and participants will be invited to speak briefly to their papers. Conference papers will be published as online conference proceedings with an ISBN under the title 'Renaissance Lives'.

For further details including maps and a booking form please go to www.roehampton.ac.uk/renaissance/ and follow the link to 'conference'. If you have any queries or would be interested in chairing a session please write to Professor Robin Headlam Wells(r.headlam_wells@roehampton.ac.uk), or Susanne Greenhalgh (s.greenhalgh@roehampton.ac.uk)

4 November

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Milton Kooistra

“Recommending the Unrecommendable”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

11-12 November, 2005

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

“Creating Women: Notions of Femininity from 1350-1700/Création de la femme : notions de la féminité de 1350 à 1700”

Location: TBA

Sponsored by the CRRS and the Renaissance Studies Program at Victoria College, University of Toronto.
Organizers: Dr. Manuela Scarci and Professor Jane Abray
Visit the conference website in English or En Français for further information.

18 November

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Neil Kenny

“TBA”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

24 November, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Click here to learn more about the TRRC

Bob Tittler

Location: Senior Common Room, Burwash Hall

“The Face of the City: Civic Portraits and Civic Identity in Post-Reformation England ”

A lecture sponsored by the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS)

Read “Typographical Biases” beforehand.

Information: e-mail Dr. Kim Yates
Tea & coffee will be served at 4:00 p.m.; the talk will begin at 4:15 p.m

2 December

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

William Calin

“The French Tradition and the Literature of Medieval and Renaissance Scotland”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

9 December

Click here to learn more about CRRS Friday Workshops

Michael O'Connor

“TBA”

Information: 416-585-4468
Participants are welcome to join our weekly Stammtisch table at the Foxes Den on Bay Street (south of Charles Street), from 5:00

February 2006

16-18 February, 2006

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

12th Annual ACMRS Conference:
Poverty and Prosperity, the Rich and the Poor in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Location: Arizona State University

ACMRS (the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies) invites session and paper proposals for its twelfth annual interdisciplinary conference to be held 16-18 February 2006.
The Center welcomes papers that explore any topic related to the study and teaching of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and especially those that focus on this year's theme of poverty and prosperity, both in its literal and metaphorical manifestations.

Selected papers related to the conference theme will be considered for publication in the twelfth volume of the "Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance" series, published by Brepols Publishers (Belgium).

The conference keynote speaker will be Mark R. Cohen, Professor of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. Professor Cohen's research focuses on the history of Jews living in Arab lands in the Middle Ages, and he has just completed a study of poverty and charity in the Geniza period.


The conference registration fee is $80 ($45 for students) and includes welcoming and concluding receptions, two days of concurrent sessions (Friday and Saturday), and keynote address. Please note that there will be an opening reception during the evening of Thursday, 16 February 2006, but there will be no sessions that day. The high temperature in the "Valley of the Sun" in February averages 70 degrees Fahrenheit (21 degrees Celsius).


The deadline for proposals will be 4:00 p.m. Mountain Standard Time on 1 October 2005. Proposals must include audio/visual requirements and any other special requests. Subsequent a/v requests may not be honored. In order to streamline the committee review process, submissions will only be accepted electronically at the conference website. Questions? Call 480-965-9323 or email the ACMRS.

10-11 March 2006

Click here to learn more about CRRS Conferences

The Centre for Medieval Studies Annual Conference: “The Body in Medieval Culture”

Location:

TBA

The last fifteen years have produced both some of the best and some of the worst critical approaches to medieval understandings of the body. These range from anachronistic projections of modern constructions of gender and sexuality onto medieval texts to more nuanced studies that take into account both medieval and modern frameworks in assessing the representation, function, and cultural import of the body. This conference, “The Body in Medieval Culture,” will focus on the ways in which conceptions of the body rooted in theological and medical discourses are manifested in the cultural production of the Middle Ages.

Invited plenary speakers include Peter Biller, Dyan Elliott, and Nicholas Watson.

We invite submissions by scholars working in a range of disciplines, including (but not limited to) history, literature, philosophy, religion, history of science, and art history. To facilitate the exchange of ideas across disciplinary boundaries, sessions will be organized in five “strands”:
devotional or theological discourse
medical (especially humoural) discourse
rhetorical and literary discourse
discourses of gender and sexuality
civic and political discourse

Please send 250-word abstracts, together with a one-page C.V., to the body conference by 20 September 2005

For more information about the CRRS, contact our Assistant to the Director, Dr. Stephanie Treloar.
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Last updated: 6 October, 2010

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