CRRS

Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Victoria University in the University of Toronto

Fundraising & Development

crrs-16Dear Friend of the CRRS,

Welcome to the 2011-2012 year of activities sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies!

Highlights this fall included a wonderful colloquium on Friendship in Early Modern Europe; Friday Workshops featuring research-in-progress by faculty; and the 47th Erasmus Lecture, which was presented by Yale professor Giuseppe Mazzotta on “Tasso’s ‘Creation of the World’ and the Post-Tridentine Controversy on Images.”

Looking ahead, the spring term will feature our Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Professor John Paoletti of Wesleyan University, a specialist in art patronage in sixteenth-century Florence. We also look forward to the eighth annual Canada Milton Seminar, which will for the first time be hosted as a joint event with the North-Eastern Milton Seminar. In mid-April, the CRRS will present its annual conference, Early Modern Migrations: Exiles, Expulsions and Religious Refugees 1400-1700. Please check the CRRS website during the year for updated information about new workshops and other events.

I’d like to highlight three major CRRS undertakings in this brief letter.

First, the CRRS is delighted to announce the initiation of a funded RSA-CRRS Visiting Fellowship. The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) has invited the CRRS to be one of four participants in its new North American short-term library fellowship program, funded through a Mellon matching grant. At the same time, the RSA will also be launching one-month visiting research fellowships valued at $2,500 at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, the Huntington Library in Los Angeles, and the Newberry Library in Chicago, so we at the University of Toronto will be in very distinguished company. The RSA and CRRS plan to hold the first competition next year and to welcome our first RSA-CRRS Fellow in 2013-2014.

Second, after the great success of last year’s Celebration of Early Modern Studies at the University of Toronto, the CRRS is thrilled to host a second celebration on 16 March 2012. This is an event aimed at developing strong interdisciplinary and community ties among early modern faculty, postdocs, and graduate students. It offers us the chance to get a snapshot of the wide range of exciting research being undertaken by colleagues, to consider possibilities for collaboration, and to engage in productive intellectual conversation and exchange.

Third, as an idea born at last year’s Celebration, this fall saw the first Early Modern Interdisciplinary Graduate Forum, which I co-organized with Timothy Harrison (doctoral candidate, English). This new CRRS venture brings together graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, and early modern faculty across campus each month for truly interdisciplinary discussion. You’ll find the year’s schedule of events here.

We welcome your participation in CRRS activities. As a supporter of the CRRS, you have contributed to the Centre’s achievements, and my colleagues and I are very grateful to you. The CRRS, described as a “treasure” by external reviewers, works hard to accomplish a lot with relatively scant resources. Therefore, we also welcome your continuing support in the form of donations. Enclosed with our Newsletter, you will find a list of the various possibilities for tax-deductible (and in some cases matched) donations, and you’ll be able to read on page 6 how two generous donors continue to contribute creatively to the Centre, greatly adding to our resources. If you wish, you may specify the activity you would like to support: library collection development, research and travel grants for graduate and undergraduate students and visiting faculty, or the Bowen concert, for example. We will issue tax receipts for all donations.

Many thanks for your support, past, present and future.

With best wishes,

Lynne Magnusson
Director

Download a Support Form in .pdf format

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